Let’s Play: Horizon Zero Dawn, The Frozen Wilds

Just in time for the end of the year and “Game of the Year” discussions, Guerrilla shrewdly released a meaty DLC for Horizon Zero Dawn, which has maintained a spot near the top of everyone’s list despite the tough competition.

Clocking in around 8-9 hours of gameplay, it’s more than a typical add-on. Clearly a lot of work went into this expansion.

While it doesn’t offer anything newly revolutionary from the base game, what it does is remind everyone why Horizon Zero Dawn was so great. Every aspect of the game is solid and polished.

A few new tweaks were added, including control towers which shook up how I approached a pack of metal machines. The devs also brought in a few new beasts, which were dialed up in toughness and aggressiveness.

Almost immediately into the DLC, I stumbled onto one and experienced a heart-pounding battle that I wasn’t quite prepared for.

The story quests have a nice balance of current day tribe politics and some Old World lore to sift through, but I wish there was slightly more personality or differentiation from this DLC tribe and what we’ve encountered throughout the original game. The Ban-Uk look slightly different and live in the harsh snow climate, but they act like every other tribe: intolerant and dismissive. That is until you (as Aloy) solve every one of their issues and quarrels to gain their overall respect.

I just wish there was a bit more variety in this new world order.

Overall, I’m simply glad to be back in this world. I greatly enjoyed the main game and still hold it in my top three of the year.

As for the videos, I blasted through them pretty quickly to get through the game. But I also played shorter episodes. Let me know if you have any thoughts on the length!

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Let’s Play: Dishonored, Death of the Outsider

I feel as if I’ve beaten this horse to death already, but Dishonored is a great series. Games like Dark Souls or MGS have never really clicked for me because I’m less into challenging gameplay or deep mechanics and more into story-driven experiences. I’d rather do a walking simulator with dialog choices than how to kill a tough boss in an FPS.

But if I can get won over by a stealth-action FPS, I think that says something.

It’s not that Dishonored has an engrossing storyline. Each installment works off of a relatively similar plot without a ton of depth.

But the world is extremely unique and interesting. Not quite steam-punk, but something that’s its own thing. And Arkane manages to change up or add to the power sets in each installment to allow for unexpected and entertaining gaming encounters. The level design is second to none, incorporating various approaches or escapes.

Death of the Outsider continues the high bar of quality, despite a more limited power set and borrowing liberally from some elements of Dishonored 2.

Some tweaks have allowed the player to use skills more often and also face less consequences for blown stealth and more action.

While the game provides some closure, I was surprised that the door wasn’t shut as definitively as I was expecting. I doubt we’ll see another Dishonored anytime soon, but Arkane has at least managed to leave a tiny crack in the void for us to come back.

Let’s Play: Uncharted, The Lost Legacy

I blasted through this latest release of Uncharted as soon and as quickly as I could. Not to get through it, but more out of excitement for a new Naughty Dog game. And possibly the last Uncharted game.

While not quite a DLC for Uncharted 4, this release doesn’t quite count as a full game. It re-uses much of the guts and elements of Uncharted 4, but involves a whole new cast and different settings.

I read a few reviews and impressions that were mostly positive but had some gripes. I think video games in a post Breath of the Wild world will have some tough things to live up to. A lot of complaints were of the limitations of the environment. If it looks like a ledge to climb, why can’t we climb it?

But I found that criticism unfair. Uncharted is not meant as an open-world game, nor is it meant to compete with adventure games like Zelda. We didn’t complain that Zelda didn’t have as deep a story or nuanced acting like Uncharted does.

What this game aims to do, it does extremely well. I loved the main characters of Chloe and Nadine. Their interplay was engaging and interesting, and their individual personalities were enjoyable and relatable.

Playing this game just made me hope that Naughty Dog continues the franchise with Chloe as the main hero. Her character is vivid and likable. I have no problem with these smaller, shorter games if it means more releases in shorter time periods.

Let’s Play: Horizon Zero Dawn

This summer we finally got a lull in an incredible year of games so that I was able to go into my backlog of games to play. At the top of that list was Horizon Zero Dawn.

Here was a new Playstation exclusive IP from a dev studio I never paid any attention to. But the pre-release buzz was really good and post-release reviews put it at the top of the games of the year, which is pretty impressive.

I state a few times in these videos that the level of polish and quality for a new IP is incredible. The visual direction and story are established with a sense of total confidence. The gameplay is tight and all the systems work together flawlessly.

And Sony has a new mascot in Aloy, a vibrant, brave, spunky, female protagonist. She has an aura of mystery but balanced with a virtuous code and a touch of rebelliousness. Ashly Burch’s vocals initially took a bit getting used to since I just kept hearing Chloe from Life is Strange, but was a great choice. Despite a few times where she sounded too much like a modern millennial, Burch gave all the poignant and emotional beats the proper weight needed to sell the story.

The main mystery in Horizon’s universe is extremely gripping and even hits a bit too close to home sometimes. I wasn’t prepared for how harrowing or tensely the history unfolded. Even though it’s told mainly through choppy holograms, audio clips, and emails, the developers were able to keep a sense of momentum and suspense that builds extremely well towards the end of the game.

In fact, the story is so tight that I’m not sure where the inevitable sequels will go. Sony has hit on a new franchise here, and especially with Nathan Drake (probably?) retiring, it’s hard to not to see more Horizon games on the… horizon.

Most online chatter has this game going neck and neck with Breath of the Wild for Game of the Year, and I can’t disagree. I’d probably put Persona 5 in the conversation. But we’re also about to ramp up again into some great looking releases in the fall.

And I’m definitely interested in diving into Horizon’s DLC in November.